About Cappadocia, Sword Valley

Kiliclar Vadasi is one of the smallest valleys in Cappadocia but it is possibly one of the most interesting to explore. It was rightly given the name Sword Valley due to the pointed rock formations that stand tall and tower over you as you wander through the baron landscape. You may feel like you've been transported back to medieval times as you walk under these sword shaped giants. At one point the trail becomes narrow like a gorge, something quite unique to the region, and you must clamber down a sturdy ladder through the wavy rock walls. 

The formations were caused by erosion on the soft volcanic tuff which is common throughout Cappadocia. Iconic cone topped Fairy Chimney can also be found throughout Sword Valley and you can take a peek inside some of the man-made cave home and rock-cut churches that were originally carved into the stone by the Early Christians who took refuge here. Abandoned dovecotes (pigeon homes) can be found hollowed into the highest points of the rocks by ancient settlers. Also in the valley lies the entrance to a 300 meter tunnel which leads into the cliffs to an abrupt dead end, the purpose of the tunnel is still unknown but it could have once been a part of one of the 36 Cave Cities located in the Cappadocia region. 

The best way to explore Sword Valley is on foot, a marked trail begins above the Goreme Open Air Museum and ends below the museum, the trail also connects with Red Valley, known for its reddish coloured rock and continues to Cavusin Village, where you can visit St John's Church. Hiking the length of Sword Valley will take about 2 hours. Alternatively you can tour the impressive Cappadocia landscape by Quad Bike or on Horseback just like the tradesmen and Silk Road travelers did hundreds of years ago. Daily Cappadocia tours offer a variety of options for visiting Sword Valley and discovering the region.